Environment

Environment and sustainable development inspector : Geneviève Dubuc - 450-562-2025 p. 3532 gdubuc@cantondegore.qc.ca

  • Lakes and Watersheds

    2013-2017 Strategic Plan for the Protection of Lakes and Watersheds

    The Municipality of the Township of Gore is particularly characterized by the presence of water. Among the hundreds of kilometers of watercourses and more than 300 bodies of water, there are 36 named lakes, 13 of which have attracted significant interest in residential development. The Township also has hundreds of wetlands of various types such as marshes, swamps and peat bogs.

    The municipality recognizes that the lakes and streams of its territory are exceptional for their citizens. In addition to creating a multitude of beautiful landscapes, these environments contribute to the quality of life of the residents of its territory. Whether through drinking water, recreational activities or the landscape, citizens have developed a sense of belonging to water bodies. Thus, the municipality seeks to protect the quality of these environments, for the benefit of the community.

    In any case, many pressures on these environments threaten their integrity and their functions and, by the same token, the goods and services they render to the community. The challenges of water management are multiple and deal with all problems and stakeholders.

    In response to these management challenges, on April 2, 2013, the Municipality of the Township of Gore adopted a 2013-2017 Strategic Plan for the Management of Lakes and Watersheds. This plan provides means to achieve the sustainable development targets set in the Environmental Policy. The orientations, the objectives and the actions proposed in this Strategic Plan will allow the municipality as well as the actors to improve the conditions of the current situation of the community, while respecting the limits of the natural environment, so as to protect the quality life and the quality of the environment for present and future generations.

    The Strategic Plan for the Management of Lakes and Watersheds is set up to achieve the desired situation with respect to the aquatic environment:

    • Maintain the quality of the water to allow the use of water;
    • Maintain water levels and flows to allow water use;
    • Protect the integrity of aquatic ecosystems to preserve the goods and services provided by the environment.

    The strategy implemented aims to achieve the following results:

    • Eliminate bacteriological and pathogenic substances from bodies of water;
    • Eliminate the intake of nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen from water bodies;
    • Eliminate erosion and transport of suspended matter in water bodies;
    • Eliminate sources of chemical contamination (pesticides, heavy metals, hydrocarbons, etc.);
    • Maintain lake water levels to protect their value and uses;
    • Maintain the flow of rivers in order to preserve the ecosystem services they provide to the environment;
    • Avoid eutrophication or accelerated aging of lakes;
    • Eliminate anthropogenic pressures threatening the integrity of aquatic environments

    Keeping in mind the main environmental targets, the Lakes and Watersheds Management Strategy proposes a management framework based on the following objectives:

    Prioritize watershed management in situation analysis, decision making and solution identification;

    • Coordinate the acquisition of knowledge between the various actors of the environment;
    • Inform, educate and sensitize community stakeholders about aquatic environments, problems and their roles in water management;
    • Establish and implement an effective regulatory framework;
    • To concoct the interests and concerns of local stakeholders in order to avoid conflicts and to establish a compromise of water use.

    Full document : Strategic Plan for lakes and Watersheds

  • Eurasian milfoil

    Eurasian milfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) is an invasive aquatic plant native to Europe, Asia and northern Africa. It grows under water and produces emergent flower spikes. It can form dense meadows at depths ranging from one to ten meters. Its stems reach the surface when it grows to less than five meters deep. It forms a dense canopy on the surface of the water (source: MDELCC, website)

    Here is a short guide produced by the CRE Laurentides to avoid an invasion:

    guide_myriophylle_AN.pdf

  • Eutrophication

    Eutrophication is defined as the natural phenomenon related to the increasing the productivity of a water body. The natural evolution of a lake is usually very slow and takes place on a geological scale. On the other hand, this process can be accelerated with the anthropic pressures which then lead to the premature aging of the water body.

    The main cause of eutrophication of water bodies is nutrient intake, mainly phosphorus and nitrogen. The presence of these elements, whose impacts are also felt on the wildlife community, accentuates the significant growth of algae and aquatic plants in the water column as well as in the shallower waters. In fact, the increase in plant populations induces a change in the faunal species present, thus modifying the interspecific relationships between living organisms. In relation to these changes, the increase in these relationships enhances lake productivity, leading to eutrophication.

    Decreased water transparency, decreased depth, increased temperature, and decreased dissolved oxygen are the direct consequences of eutrophication on the environment. The body of water is gradually changing and this change in the ecosystem is causing changes in the dynamics of wildlife and plant populations. Eutrophication also increases the risk of proliferation of cyanobacteria. For water users, all this translates into loss of recreational use, loss of the aesthetic value of the environment and even loss of value of properties.

    Eutrophication is a complex process linking many living and non-living components of the aquatic ecosystem. In any case, the accelerated and artificial increase of the water body is due to human activities and uses.

    Main potential causes:

    • Anthropogenic inputs of nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen;
    • Sediment inputs from erosion sites or other sediment entrainment sources;
    • Intensive development along the lakes and artificialisation of the banks.
  • Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae)

    For a long time, they were called blue-green algae, refusing to consider them as bacteria. Unlike other bacteria, they contain chlorophyll and draw their energy from sunlight. Their common name for blue-green algae comes from the fact that the first identified cyanobacteria were blue-green in color. However, this is not the case for all cyanobacteria: some are olive green or dark green, others are even more violet.

    In recent years, an increasing number of Quebec lakes have had to be closed to swimming and boating because of the proliferation of cyanobacteria. The consequences in humans are of the cutaneous order, but they can also have significant impacts for the liver and the digestive system if the contaminated water is swallowed. If you suspect that you have been in contact with toxins and have these symptoms, rinse your skin and see a doctor immediately.

    For the average homeowner, the main home is the largest investment of his life. Lakeside residents are certainly the most directly threatened by the proliferation of cyanobacteria.

    It is also important to report the presence of cyanobacteria on any body of water near your municipality.

  • Riparian Strips naturalization

    Natural shores serve as bulwarks against soil erosion, barrier against sediment inputs to water bodies, filter for nutrients, shield against excessive warming of water, habitat for the fauna and flora, regulating the water cycle and natural windbreak.

    The project to renaturalize the riparian strip is carried out on the waterways of the Township of Gore, that is to say on the lakes, as well as on all their tributaries. This project aims to revegetate and enhance the private riparian lands located on the territory of the Municipality, in order to protect against erosion of the banks and to improve the quality of water in the long term. In addition, a sensitization component will help inform the riparian and user population of the water bodies on the importance of protecting the shoreline.

    Thus, the municipality puts its expertise at your service with its resident support program for the renaturalisation of their shoreline. This program consists primarily of a free service for the realization of shoreline development plans. A team will visit your home to discuss your needs, constraints and desires to develop plans that will be given to you at no cost. To benefit from our services, simply contact our team to schedule an appointment. It should be noted, however, that the purchase of the plants and the planting are at the expense of the owners. However, to encourage renaturalization, the municipality offers to interested trees, shrubs and herbaceous at reduced prices for residents who undertake to renaturaliser their bank on a minimum of 5 meters wide and along the entire length of their bank ( excluding access to the body of water).

    Here is the Plant Catalog : Plant catalog 2019.pdf

    And the Purchase order form : Bon de commande - Purchase Order.pdf


    In order to take advantage of the various aspects of this program offered by the municipality, interested riparian landowners must contact:

    Alexia Dion

    Renaturalization Awareness Officer

    Téléphone : 450-562-2025 poste 3544 

  • Septic systems

    Proper maintenance of your septic system is extremely important for your family and your fellow residents, but it is even more important considering the direct impact it has on the water quality of the Gore watershed. A simple defect can have consequences far beyond the mere cost of repairs.

    Sewage leaks from a non-conforming septic system promote the growth of algae and vegetation and a lower index of oxygen dissolution. Your facility may leak nutrients, such as phosphorus and nitrates, whose presence significantly enhances the proliferation of cyanobacteria. The improper operation of the facility also promotes the development of harmful bacteria, protozoa and viruses that can contaminate groundwater, streams and lakes, and exposes the public to the multiple risks of direct contact with water. waste.

    Regular maintenance is the most effective way to prevent the risk of breakage of any septic system.

    The Provincial by-law requires all the owners to empty the septic tank:

    • every two (2) years for full-time residents,
    • every four (4) years for part-time residents.

    A copy of the emptying bill must be submitted to the Municipality.

    Here's what you can do more:

    • Monitor your septic field regularly, paying attention to soft soil, liquid reflux, odors and soil compaction.
    • Regularly monitor the plumbing (sinks, toilets, showers) to prevent leakage.
    • Operate appliances, such as dishwashers and washing machines, and faucets, one at a time.
    • Wait a few hours between the loads, and make only full loads.
    • Direct all drains from the entrance, roof and deck away from the leaching field.
    • Avoid additives for septic tanks that are superfluous and have no impact on the frequency of emptying. In addition, these substances pass into the field of purification and are inevitably found in our streams and lakes.
    • Avoid the use of waste crushers. They generate a high level of organic solids in the soil favorable to the proliferation of bacteria and other undesirable micro-organisms.
    • Avoid using products to kill bacteria, as it also causes damage to the organic components essential to the proper functioning of the septic system:
          
      • antibiotics (which kill bacteria)
      • household cleaners that contain bleach, acids or disinfectants;
      • polishing products;
      • caustic products;


    • Avoid products whose labels mention health risks such as ingestion and contact with the skin;
    • Never throw grease or oil into your drain;
    • Avoid all products such as phosphate and nitrates found in many household detergents. They contribute directly to the hatching of cyanobacteria and prevent an adequate dissolution of oxygen in the basin;
    • Never dispose of cigarette filters, sanitary napkins or other inorganic solids in the toilet.

    Here are some alternatives to toxic cleaners:

    • Soap: Choose phosphate-free and non-toxic products
    • Scouring powder: baking soda;
    • Fiberglass cleaner: Baking soda paste;
    • Floor Cleaner: A cup of vinegar in five liters of water;
    • Glass cleaner: One cup of vinegar and a cup of warm water;
    • Copper cleaner: Lemon juice and salt;
    • Brass Cleaner: Worcestershire sauce or a dough made of salt, vinegar and water in equal parts. rinse;
    • Chrome cleaner: Clean with apple cider vinegar, polish with baby oil;
    • To unclog the drains: Pour vinegar and baking soda into the drain. Finish with boiling water;
    • To remove mildew: equal parts: lemon juice or vinegar and salt;
    • To clean wood: Three parts olive oil and one part white vinegar.

    Your septic system may be defective even if it seems to be working well. A well-maintained system is designed to last from 20 to 30 years. Breakdowns are frequently caused by soil saturation surrounding the system by organic plant deposition, but several other factors can lead to premature failure of a septic system:

    • Pipes blocked or damaged by roots;
    • Saturation of the soil by abundant rains;
    • Broken tiles;
    • Poorly located, poorly designed or installed installation;
    • Poorly maintained installation.

    The following are symptoms of malfunctioning a septic system:

    • Smell of rotten eggs indoors or outdoors;
    • Discharge of sewage into the toilet or bath drains;
    • Sewage seepage over the leaching field;
    • Sound gurgles in the plumbing system;
    • Pale green grass above the leaching field;
    • A self-test is available free of charge at the Municipality office for all registered taxpayers.

    Here's what to do in case of breakage:

    • Contact our municipal inspectors, Jérôme Mercier or Geneviève Dubuc, immediately at 450 562-2025. They will advise you immediately on what steps to take;
    • Have your system inspected to determine the cause of the breakage. Fix the problem to prevent future breakage;
    • Have your system repaired without delay. You are required by law. Note that the municipality will take the necessary actions in case of negligence or refusal to cooperate. 
       
  • Municipal Boat Launch and cleaning station

    Summary of the rules of use of the Municipal Landing at Lake Barron

    Any boat launched must be provided with a sticker except canoes, kayaks and paddle boards.

        The stickers can be obtained at the municipal office by completing the Form and providing the required documents.
        The sticker must be affixed to the starboard side and be visible at all times.
        It is possible to obtain a maximum of 2 vignettes per civic address.

    Shoreline owners may only use their existing descent for their own enjoyment and personal use. The installation of a new descent is formally prohibited.

    Every boat must be washed before it is launched at the municipal landing stage in a washing station recognized by the Municipality. The Municipality will offer this service to the municipal park. The cost of cleaning is included in the cost of obtaining the sticker. Cleaning is free for boats without engines. THE BOAT WASHING STATION IS SELF-SERVICE.  

    It's forbidden :

    To put a boat in the water without vignette and / or bearing signs of contamination;

    • To park a vehicle and / or trailer on the roads;
    • Bring live bait into a container whose water comes from a lake other than Lake Barron. Containers will be checked and may be  
    • To drain the water from the engine cooling system or ballast system in Barron Lake.
     Access type
     Boat types
     Fees 
    ANNUAL PERMIT for sholine owner or owners of servitudes
    Embarcations de 10cv ou moins 
     20 $
    Embarcations de plus de 10cv et moins de 75 cv 
     40 $
    Embarcations de 75cv et plus 
     60 $
    DAILY PASS
     (Résidents Gore) 
    Embarcations de 10cv ou moins 
     20 $
    Embarcations de plus de 10cv et moins de 75cv 
     60 $
    Embarcation de 75cv et plus Bateaux à «wake» et moto-marines 
     Interdit
      DAILY PASS
      (Non Résidents) 
    Embarcations de 10cv ou moins 
     150 $
    Embarcations de plus de 10cv et moins de 75cv 
     500 $
    Embarcation de 75cv et plus 
    Bateaux à « wake » et moto-marines
     Interdit 
  • Natural Landspace

    2013-2017 strategic plan for the protection and enhancement of natural environments

    The Municipality of the Township of Gore is known for the quality of its natural landscape. Apart from certain particular sectors that have experienced significant residential development, most of the territory remains in its natural state. Mountains, forests and wetlands provide residents of Gore with an exceptional living environment.

    As a whole, natural environments provide a multitude of goods and services for society. Whether through its supply of goods, its regulatory services, the quality of its landscapes or the sense of belonging they create among residents, the natural environment is of great socio-environmental value.

    In any case, many pressures on these environments threaten their integrity and their functions and, by the same token, the goods and services they render to the community. The challenges of managing natural environments are multiple and deal with all problems and stakeholders.

    In the face of these management challenges, the Municipality of the Canton of Gore will have, through this Strategic Plan, means to achieve the sustainable development targets it has set in terms of protection and enhancement of natural environments. The orientations, the objectives and the actions proposed in this Strategic Plan will allow the municipality as well as the actors to improve the conditions of the current situation of the community, while respecting the limits of the natural environment, so as to protect the quality of life and the quality of the environment for present and future generations.

    The Strategic Plan for the protection and enhancement of natural environments is put in place to achieve the desired situation in the aquatic environment:

    • Protect the integrity of ecosystems and preserve biodiversity;
    • Preserve fragile environments and exceptional elements;
    • Promote the development of green spaces through recreational activities, the interpretation of ecology and the sharing of knowledge.

    The strategy implemented aims to achieve the following results:

    • Achieve a level of conservation equivalent to 30% of the municipality's territory in protected natural areas;
    • Achieving a level of conservation equivalent to 10% of the municipality's territory in protected wetlands;
    • Preserve large massifs of natural environments;
    • Preserve a variety of ecosystem types and habitats;
    • Limit fragmentation in protected natural environments;
    • Establish conservation corridors to create a network of protected natural environments;
    • Establish a variety of recreational activities to enhance the natural environment;
    • Establish programs of information, education and interpretation of natural environments.

    Keeping in mind the main environmental targets, the strategy proposes a management framework based on the following objectives:

    Prioritize an overall vision in situation analysis, decision making and solution identification;

    • Coordinate the acquisition of knowledge between the various actors of the environment;
    • Inform, educate and educate community stakeholders about natural environments, problems and their roles in conservation and development;
    • Establish and implement an effective regulatory framework;
    • To concoct the interests and the concerns of the actors of the environment in order to avoid the conflicts and to establish a compromise of use of the natural environments.

    The Voluntary Conservation and Private Land Stewardship Program is a program of the Strategic Plan for the Protection and Enhancement of Natural Habitats of the Municipality of the Township of Gore. It groups together all actions focusing on voluntary conservation on private lands.

    The program is designed specifically for large property owners with a strong interest in protecting and enhancing the natural attributes of their properties.

    In this sense, the main objective of the program is to involve the owners of the Township of Gore in the preservation and enhancement of natural environments on their property. The specific objectives of the program are:

    • To acquire new knowledge on the components of the natural environment;
    • Inform and educate the owners about the issues of the natural environment and their role in their protection;
    • Reconcile the interests and uses of the owners with the objectives of preservation and enhancement of the natural environment.

    As part of this program, the Municipality offers its services to meet the owners, visit their property, discuss the attributes of interest for preservation and propose conservation options that meet the needs of each. The program also aims to sign a personalized conservation agreement between the owners and the Municipality.